CURA.

ANNA FRANCESCHINI
Did you know you have a broken glass
in the window?

Vistamarestudio, Milan

Feb 4 – March 21, 2020

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Press Release

Anna Franceschini continues her exploration of the narrative potential of displays and of the shop window as a para-cinematographic device.

The title is inspired by a story that actually happened at Tiffany’s New York in 1984, when an alarmed client mixed up the broken glass in a window display for an accidental damage, while in reality was a scenographic stratagem. The visionary display was created by Gene Moore, the brand’s artistic director from ‘50s to ‘90s, whose window designs are conserved at the Smithsonian Institution.

For this exhibition the artist has created a new film which employs the now-familiar repertoire of objects that has come to typify her practice, reinterpreting the shapes and materials of some of the window displays devised by the legendary American designer. Display units, souvenirs, props and lens filters, from Anna Franceschini’s personal archive, are used to create an immersive environment crowded with photographic and moving images, in a meditation on the very act of displaying and exhibiting.

In the gallery transformed by an environmental intervention, five new photographs in which the objects, part of a scenography, become sculptural images that, like post-materialistic still life, expose the aesthetic dynamics of the display.

Reminiscent of Surrealist landscapes and Joseph Cornell’s shadow boxes, the extreme accuracy of Franceschini’s cinematographic and photographic language revels a pleasure for the simple artifice of optical illusions and for the craftsmanship of producing images. The artist reflects on the scenic representation in which the distinction between commodity and artwork increasingly blurred.

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CREDITS
Courtesy of the artist and Vistamare/Vistamarestudio, Pescara/Milano.
Photo by Andrea Rossetti

OTHER TIPS
Here, in the building where Georges Bizet wrote his masterpiece Carmen in 1875, Matt Copson premieres a bildungsroman opera in three laser-projected parts: Age of Coming, Coming of Age and Of Coming Age. His opera tells the story of a baby at odds with a vengeful god, who tries to convince him that life is miserable and cruel, and nothing more. On view High Art, Paris
Sørlandets Kunstmuseum, Kristiansand
Der Tank of the Art Institute, Basel
Lafayette Anticipations, Paris
Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon
JTT, New York
Édouard Montassut, Paris
Avant-Garde Institute, Warsaw