CURA.

CLEO FARISELLI
DY YIAYI 

Operativa Arte Contemporanea, Rome

March 9 – April 30, 2018

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Dy Yiayi is the mysterious inscription on the doorbell in the studio where the artist lived while she was realising the exhibition. 
 In everyday diction, the inscription becomes an hypnotic, familiar, yet arcane sound, a mantra and a password to access the peculiar space-time of the works. Cleo Fariselli transforms the gallery into an ideal hereinafter and transposition of these private rooms. Veiled by a rose-tone filter, the gallery glass entrance turns into a great ideal ajar eyelid. On the inside, a few iconic furniture pieces help creating an ambiguous sense of off-putting domesticity. 
 Such sensation is further nourished by a feminine bathing song, coming from downstairs, which is impossible to enter; dreamy and selfreferenced, the audio installation was inspired by the mythical character Melusina. In the first room sits the Untitled sculpture series, obtained through the raku Japanese technique for ceramic. The apparent spontaneity of shapes, inspired by natural concretions of shells and lava rock, grows when, to a closer look, the notches on the works turn out to recall the volumes of proportions of the artist’s body. Conceived as devices of vision, the sculptures are inviting to be explored by gaze as if they were environments. In the second room sits the curtain/sculpture Cleo, kept on the ground by three asleep heads, obtained through the ancient technique of scagliola carpigiana. Drawn after a cast of the artist’s face at 17, the sculptures are a mark from a faraway time, symbolising and crystallising a key moment in her life. Though deriving from two techniques that lay their tradition in the 16th Century, Cleo Fariselli uses raku and scagliola free from any rhetoric, as a key to explore a personal and contemporary imaginary. Closing the exhibition there’s Edda: a sculpture/installation in four parts depicting a mysterious water creature that seems to be rising from the floor, making it ideally liquid. As if it were the tip of the iceberg, the artwork reverberates beyond its visual limits, raising the impression of a hereinafter indefinitely extended in the underground. At the entrance, a text written by the artist guides the viewer through the visit, preferably to be conducted alone.

Credits
Photos by Sebastano Luciano

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