CURA.

ED ATKINS

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Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin are hosting a double solo exhibition of British artist Ed Atkins, on view until January 29. The works Even Pricks (2013), Warm, Warm, Warm Spring Mouths (2013), Ribbons (2014), Counting I & II (2014), Hisser (2015) and Happy Birthday!!! (2014), in addition to several new interventions by the artist, are on show at Castello di Rivoli, while Safe Conduct (2016) is presented at Fondazione Sandretto.

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The exhibition at Rivoli, curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev and Marianna Vecellio, reflects on the combination of tangibility and absence found in the phantasmagoric dimension of the venue: an ancient castle “under a spell”, perhaps inhabited by ghosts, where such a material intangibility seems to be rendered by the artist via the reality of HD and the digital realm. In contrast, the contemporary architecture of Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo hosts the artist’s most recent work, Safe Conduct (2016), a three-channel video-installation whose images incorporate footage of airports that show travelers the procedure to follow in order to pass security checks. In addition to the video-installation, a series of new graphic works related to Safe Conduct is on view in the foundation’s spaces.

Ed Atkins
Castello di Rivoli
Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin
Through January 29

OTHER TIPS
“Fantastic gardens, hybrid creatures, bouquets of epiphytic stories, synthetic fragrances and mythological machines, but also colours, crystals, songs and infrasounds which could be intended for us humans as much as for our contemporaries: plants, animals, minerals, breaths and chemistries, waves and bacteria, are just some of the ingredients that make up the porous landscapes of this 15th Lyon Biennale.
The artist takes into consideration some well-known artists of the last decades, insinuating doubt into certain dominant narratives, forcing us to look differently at or adjust our focus on existing works. At Istituto Svizzero, Milan
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, artists like Cézanne and Matisse took up this motif to express evolving notions about the body, changing ideas about pleasure, one’s relationship to nature, and how the longing for the new (in art) potentially renews a broader and more inclusive understanding of what it means to live with or against societal changes. Greene Naftali, New York
Antoine Levi, Paris
Galerie Perrotin, Paris
Peres Projects, Berlin
C L E A R I N G, New York
HangarBicocca, Milan