CURA.

JOANNE BURKE,
VALENTINA CAMERANESI
A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave

Operativa Arte Contemporanea, Rome

Oct 18 – Dec 8, 2019 

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Press Release

A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave is an Elizabethan English term used to describe the XVI century technique employed to define a fine fabric ribbon which supports a pendant jewel. The expression, found among the inventory of Elizabeth the Ist closet, blends the art of ribbon making and of jewelry together.

As the ribbon flows into a precious jewel at our gaze, Joanne Burke and Valentina Cameranesi artworks are here weaved together in a watery, fluid joint show connection.
A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave is a jewel-sculpture collection of pieces refreshing the tradition of Italian modern design on one hand, and traditional jewel making on the other. The gallery will host a selection of ceramic design pieces with jewelled inserts ranging from tender, organic shapes hanging from the ceiling like old chandeliers to geometric, hard shaped works like almost vanity objects.

As in the seamless crossing between the ribbon which supports the jewel and the jewel which decorates the ribbon, the idea of a wave is here recalled as a design in nature as well as in artisanal form. The infinite interpretation of the title is mirrored throughout the show while also reminding us of the art and craft of decorative arts and design.

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Joanne Burke - Valentina Cameranesi, A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave, exhibition view, Operativa, Rome 2019. Photo: Sebastiano Luciano 
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Joanne Burke - Valentina Cameranesi, A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave, exhibition detail, Operativa, Rome 2019. Photo: Sebastiano Luciano 
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Joanne Burke - Valentina Cameranesi, A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave, exhibition detail, Operativa, Rome 2019. Photo: Sebastiano Luciano 
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Joanne Burke - Valentina Cameranesi, A Ten Boed Poynt in a Wave, exhibition detail, Operativa, Rome 2019. Photo: Sebastiano Luciano 
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