CURA.

JOSH KLINE AT 47 CANAL, NEW YORK

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Josh Kline’s Unemployment, on view at 47 Canal, New York, is presented as a chapter of a science-fiction novel, fast forward ten or twenty years from our present – half a generation, in 2031 precisely. As incredible as realistic. There will be other priorities, and other policies as well.

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And what about the job? The artist supposes that the majority of careers have been starved to near-death or such that unemployment potentially regards everyone. Consequently, the human value could be questioned and every single doubt and fear could involve ourselves. The exhibition offers different sceneries. Will you Airbnb your body out to strangers in order to make rent? Josh Kline gives us a sort of scenic representation, that recalls Archizoom’s “12 Ideal Cities”. Your mind has left the real economy, but your body still needs to eat food and spend its days somewhere. Not only the press release, but also the whole exhibition, could be read as a crucial manifesto. Your brain is no longer required here. Capitalism doesn’t care about you. Economic systems don’t have feelings. In a society designed around planned obsolescence, the inevitable fate of goods and services and the people who provide them is to become waste. The same economic alchemy that transmutes a human being into a product—into “human capital”—also turns them into sentient garbage. The other side of consumption’s cheap coin is disposal. Desired, acquired, used, used up, discarded, forgotten—this is the lifecycle of expendable labor inside a runaway free market. The first step towards a cure is diagnosing the disease. You are not your job. You are not your career. You are a human being.

 

Unemployment by Josh Kline
47 Canal, New York
Through June 12th

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