CURA.

RED, GREEN, BLUE, LOOM MUSIC. SIMON STARLING

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Red, Green, Blue, Loom Music, Simon Starling’s solo show at Galleria Franco Noero, Turin, evolved from the artist’s on-going engagement with the history of design and manufacture in Turin. It began with a visit to Antica Fabbrica Passamanerie Massia Vittorio 1843, a family run company producing high quality woven fabrics, brocades and decorative trimmings on looms dating back to the 1780s. Many of the looms are still automated using the once revolutionary late 18th century technology of Jacquard punch cards. Starling’s interest in the company was further compounded by the discovery of a piece of handwritten sheet music entitled La Macchina Tessile (The Loom) on a baby-grand piano located in the factory’s showroom: the piece was composed by musician Rinaldo Bellucci in response to the factory’s enchanting machines. After recording the music, Starling translated it into a visual “score” using a specific software; the visual account of the music was then formulated as a chain of cardboard Jacquard punch cards. Such a process of translation from musical score to woven textile was filmed in a video shown at the gallery: the short film is projected using a 3 beam video projector that “weaves” red, green and blue light together into a color image, mimicking the weaving process.

Red, Green, Blue, Loom Music by Simon Starling
Galleria Franco Noero, Turin
Through March 5

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OTHER TIPS
“Fantastic gardens, hybrid creatures, bouquets of epiphytic stories, synthetic fragrances and mythological machines, but also colours, crystals, songs and infrasounds which could be intended for us humans as much as for our contemporaries: plants, animals, minerals, breaths and chemistries, waves and bacteria, are just some of the ingredients that make up the porous landscapes of this 15th Lyon Biennale.
The artist takes into consideration some well-known artists of the last decades, insinuating doubt into certain dominant narratives, forcing us to look differently at or adjust our focus on existing works. At Istituto Svizzero, Milan
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, artists like Cézanne and Matisse took up this motif to express evolving notions about the body, changing ideas about pleasure, one’s relationship to nature, and how the longing for the new (in art) potentially renews a broader and more inclusive understanding of what it means to live with or against societal changes. Greene Naftali, New York
Antoine Levi, Paris
Galerie Perrotin, Paris
Peres Projects, Berlin
C L E A R I N G, New York
HangarBicocca, Milan