CURA.

SPACE SHUTTLE IN THE GARDEN. PETRIT HALILAJ

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Space Shuttle in the Garden, Petrit Halilaj’s first institutional solo exhibition in Italy, on view at Milan HangarBicocca until March 13, brings together a selection of works from recent years as well as new ones conceived specifically for the occasion. Setting out from the life and history of the artist and from the changes that have occurred in his native country, the show explores universal themes such as memory, the search for identity, and the concept of home as both a shared and private space, arriving at reflections on community and on the creation and preservation of a common cultural heritage. Positioned outside Pirelli HangarBicocca, the work They are Lucky to be Bourgeois Hens II (2009) serves as an antechamber to the show: a wooden rocket ship constructed by the artist’s relatives, neighbors and friends, with its interior painted an elegant Klein blue, is inhabited by chickens, preparing to discover a new still to be invented world. As an iconic work of the 2010 Berlin Biennial, The places I’m looking for, my dear, are utopian places, they are boring and I don’t know how to make them real (2010-2015), the artist’s reconstructed life-size family house, appears here in a completely new form. Suspended within the exhibition space, the house, now fragmented, reflects the changes its inhabitants have lived through. Si Okarina e Runikut (2014) is a series of sculptures inspired by a Neolithic wind instrument found in the village of Runik, Kosovo. The works are vessel flutes that invite visitor participation; while originally conceived to be played individually, the artist reconstructed them to possibly enable collective engagement.

Space Shuttle in the Garden by Petrit Halilaj
HangarBicocca, Milan
Through March 13

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OTHER TIPS
“Fantastic gardens, hybrid creatures, bouquets of epiphytic stories, synthetic fragrances and mythological machines, but also colours, crystals, songs and infrasounds which could be intended for us humans as much as for our contemporaries: plants, animals, minerals, breaths and chemistries, waves and bacteria, are just some of the ingredients that make up the porous landscapes of this 15th Lyon Biennale.
The artist takes into consideration some well-known artists of the last decades, insinuating doubt into certain dominant narratives, forcing us to look differently at or adjust our focus on existing works. At Istituto Svizzero, Milan
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, artists like Cézanne and Matisse took up this motif to express evolving notions about the body, changing ideas about pleasure, one’s relationship to nature, and how the longing for the new (in art) potentially renews a broader and more inclusive understanding of what it means to live with or against societal changes. Greene Naftali, New York
Antoine Levi, Paris
Galerie Perrotin, Paris
Peres Projects, Berlin
C L E A R I N G, New York
HangarBicocca, Milan