CURA.

Text by Whitney Mallett
by Kat Herriman
(CURA. 28) Enter Paul Sepuya whose art stands like a lighthouse blinking in this storm. Sepuya’s use of his own body in his photographs is both an act of transparency as well as an assertion that his humanity is behind the work, not an algorithm, app or third party. Text by Nikki Darling
CURA.28
Calame’s works are not placed in empty space and do not comply with aesthetic and formal parameters.
by Ciara Moloney
by Anna Gritz
by Cecilia Alemani
by Liam Considine
by Loïc Le Gall
A machine is too big of a word. It brings to mind an impossibly vast range of images – gears, steel, steam, molded plastic, blinking lights, switches, screens, and so much more.
by Daniel S. Palmer
“THE CONCEPT OF ‘ANTI’ IN ANTI-MUSEUM SHOULD BE UNDERSTOOD AS THE DEMOLITION OF THE PHYSICAL…
by Anna Gritz
“To me, a body of work by a given artist has an inherent kind of…
“Figurative art today has reached a point where in Europe and America a language is…
by Rose Bouthillier
by Chris Sharp
Text by Chris Sharp
There is a powerful mood of ambivalence that quivers in and around the work of Scottish artist Rachel Maclean. It can be seen in her cast of cutesy characters with pastel-colored skin and hair and wide-eyed stares, who with saccharine smiles sing in major keys of HAPPINESS and RAINBOWS to a shifting triumvirate of ghoulish TV talent show hosts.
by Frances Loeffler
by Laura Phipps and Elisabeth Sherman
by Frances Loeffler
by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer
by James Cahill
by Jenny Jaskey
by Ciara Moloney
by Hans Ulrich Obrist
by Franklin Melendez