Interview

On the occasion of the show, on view at mo.Co.Panacée in montepellier until 03.01.2021, Cura. speaks with its curator, Vincent Honoré, about the concept of the exhibition and the relation between body politics, esoterism, and deviance. Read more

CURA. is a curatorial editorial platform, founded by Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin in 2009, and consists of a magazine, a publishing house, and an exhibition program that works internationally in collaboration with museums, foundations, galleries, institutions and independents. Curatorial research and critical activity developed by CURA. is focused on both the investigation of new contemporary languages and on the development and implementation of new exhibition formats.

Video caption

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

To a vision of the world so rich in angles, imperfections, timbres, and devoid of any possible objectification, Patrizio Di Massimo’s pictorial clarity seems to respond as a magnifying glass capable of looking into the folds of reality and thus becoming the only true and possible key to understanding. It is a painting that amplifies, that highlights, that seems to scrutinize without judgment. The cathartic effect of the gaze impressed on the canvas can only highlight a perfectly imperfect world, which includes desires, feelings and inclinations that the artist cleverly brings to the surface. The representation thus becomes an allegory of contemporary man, a character with a thousand faces à la Pirandello, who similarly to an interpreter is able to play different roles and offer the viewers the possibility of choosing their favorite.

To a vision of the world so rich in angles, imperfections, timbres, and devoid of any possible objectification, Patrizio Di Massimo’s pictorial clarity seems to respond as a magnifying glass capable of looking into the folds of reality and thus becoming the only true and possible key to understanding2. It is a painting that amplifies, that highlights, that seems to scrutinize without judgment. The cathartic effect of the gaze impressed on the canvas can only highlight a perfectly imperfect world, which includes desires, feelings and inclinations that the artist cleverly brings to the surface. The representation thus becomes an allegory of contemporary man, a character with a thousand faces à la Pirandello, who similarly to an interpreter is able to play different roles and offer the viewers the possibility of choosing their favorite.

To a vision of the world so rich in angles, imperfections, timbres, and devoid of any possible objectification, Patrizio Di Massimo’s pictorial clarity seems to respond as a magnifying glass capable of looking into the folds of reality and thus becoming the only true and possible key to understanding. It is a painting that amplifies, that highlights, that seems to scrutinize without judgment. The cathartic effect of the gaze impressed on the canvas can only highlight a perfectly imperfect world, which includes desires, feelings and inclinations that the artist cleverly brings to the surface. The representation thus becomes an allegory of contemporary man, a character with a thousand faces à la Pirandello, who similarly to an interpreter is able to play different roles and offer the viewers the possibility of choosing their favorite.

Texts by:

Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, Nora Khan, Eleonora Farina, Giulia Bini

Artists:

Zach Blas and Jemima Wyman, Carola Bonfili, Ian Cheng, Cécile B. Evans, Jamian Juliano- Villani, Nathaniel Mellors and Erkka Nissinen, Trevor Paglen, Pakui Hardware, Agnieszka Polska, Jon Rafman, Lorenzo Senni, Avery K Singer, Cheyney Thompson, Luca Trevisani, Anna Uddenberg, Emilio Vavarella

The exhibition anticipates the first monographic book by Patrizio Di Massimo, published by CURA. and to be released in November 2019.

 

Thanks to the support of T293, Rome, and ChertLüdde, Berlin.

PHOTO CREDITS:
Installation views photos by Alessandro Zambianchi
Single works photos by Andrea Rossetti
Courtesy the artist, ChertLüdde, Berlin and T293, Rome

REVIEW
Artforum
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PATRIZIO DI MASSIMO
(b. 1983, Italy) lives and works in London, where he graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art. Solo shows include: Palazzo Ducale, Urbino (Upcoming: November 2019), ChertLüdde, Berlin (2018), Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels (2017), NICC, Brussels (2016), Monteverdi, Tuscany (2015), T293, Rome (2014), Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon (2014), Gasworks, London (2013), Villa Medici, Rome (2012). Recent group include: A Tale of a Tub, Rotterdam (2019), Museion, Bolzano (2018), EVA International, Limerick (2018), HangarBicocca, Milan (2017), BASEMENT ROMA, Rome (2016), Fiorucci Art Trust, London (2015), Triennale di Milano (2015), MuHKA, Antwerp (2014), Castello di Rivoli, Tourin (2014), Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2013), MAXXI, Rome (2012).

Big text type B: The representation thus becomes an allegory of contemporary man, a character with a thousand faces à la Pirandello, who similarly to an interpreter is able to play different roles and offer the viewers the possibility of choosing their favorite.

Big text type C: The representation thus becomes an allegory of contemporary man, a character with a thousand faces à la Pirandello, who similarly to an interpreter is able to play different roles and offer the viewers the possibility of choosing their favorite.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm.

Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18)

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18)

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen

Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018

This is a video caption

Samuel Leuenberger: As co-curators in close dialogue with each other at all times, what do you think has changed the most over the last ten years in terms of running a non-for-profit space together – as partners finding solutions and themes to explore?

JOÃO MOURÃO AND LUIS SILVA: In the first years we were very much interested in the institution as a thing in and of itself. We were exploring what an institution is and what modes of instituting we were able to imagine and produce as part of a community. Those reflections led to an institutional model that placed ideas of generosity, sociability and solidarity at the core of the institution, whose main outcome was identified as friendship. That has not disappeared, of course, and it is still the way we operate, but recently we have been more interested in issues of representation and how they are tied to existing power structures. We have been interested in thinking critically and acting towards acknowledging which personal subjectivities and views of the world are allowed to become public – and of whom – and which ones aren’t. We have been interested in identifying how power is distributed in the world. There are those whose set of references constitute the norm, thus enabling them to give names to things and there are those who don’t have the power to name or to create categories using their own references. We wish to shuffle this as much as possible. What has remained constant throughout the years and these changes in focus is our commitment to artists as individuals and to their practices. We love commissioning new work and thinking about all these issues through being close to the artist and being allowed to be part of a process that goes from dialogue to display.

SL: You mentioned previously how Lisbon has changed drastically, tourism has gentrified the center, the art scene has been transformed in many ways. What do feel are the pros and cons of working in your field in Lisbon and Portugal at large? What are the biggest changes that impacted your work?

J&L: The Lisbon that was favourable to the appearance of Kunsthalle Lissabon in 2009 has very little in common with the gentrified and touristified Lisbon of 2019. It would hardly be possible to start today as we did in 2009. The pros of this are pretty clear and visible: it pulled us out of the economical crisis, which was, as you know, devastating on many levels. The cons are the sense of loss and disenfranchisement that local people feel in their city. We lost usership and ownership of large parts of the city, which now cater only to tourists and their needs. Even if people still try to live in those neighbourhoods, life is extremely complicated. Things like bakeries or butcher shops have all disappeared and have been replaced by cheap souvenir shops and wine tasting bars. When we started, if we would say to someone we had just met we were from Lisbon, we would get a shrug. Now, when we say the same thing, we get some weird hyperbole like “OMG, Lisbon is the best city in the world, I so wanna move there, it’s awesome!” Oddly enough this has not impacted the way we have worked. Our audience is both the local artistic community and an international one, so it hasn’t been significantly affected by these processes. However, we feel responsible for the process of ‘cool-ification’ of the city and that’s why for our tenth anniversary we wanted to step back, and disappear from the cultural fabric of the city, reflecting on the responsibility that we have in this process and on the critical role that we can have in thinking of other ways of imagining the position that contemporary art occupies under these new circumstances.

EDITORS IN CHIEF
Ilaria Marotta
Andrea Baccin

CURA. TEAM
Costanza Paissan (Managing Editor)
Sofia Gallarate
Giulia Leone

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Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

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Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

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Andrew Kuo, FIRST WILL (6-25-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 65 x 80 in. / 165.1 x 203.2 cm. Top Image: Andrew Kuo, 2ND OPINION (8-6-18), 2018, acrylic and carbon transfer on linen, 71 x 78 in. / 180.3 x 198.1 cm.

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